Your Life. 17.99% APR.

Debt is a plague that robs you of your life.

The Book of Proverbs says “the borrower is slave to the lender”. Shakespeare gave this advice: “neither a borrower nor a lender be”.

So how did most people in the Western World get so far into Debt Slavery?

The Plague of Debt began when banks, credit card companies, department stores, travel companies etc. realized that if they used really powerful subliminal messaging and other highly effective but suspicious means, then they could increase their sales.

They began putting faded pictures of seductive women hidden in print ads. They began scenting the air of hotels, stores & casinos with fragrances that encourage taking out your wallet and spending. Movie theaters began flashing pictures of popcorn too fast for you to see consciously.

But, there is now something powerful you can do about it to GET YOURSELF OUT OF DEBT.

You will learn how to get out of debt. Fast. Permanently. More on this new method to come. First, a bit of history…

Companies began listening more to shareholders’ greed rather than integrity and reason. Giant computer programs now analyze your behavior constantly and every time you do anything. Every service you use (like your credit cards) and every item that you buy in every store – all that information is captured, processed and sold to others who figure out the best way to market directly to you using your own information.

Tens of thousands of ads hit your subconscious every day. Not a single one of them encourages reason, caution & savings. Every one of them brilliantly displays the benefits of over-spending. And, so you spend. And, over-spend.

Every possible way is used to cajole you into doing what advertisers and merchants want. If an ad does not work, it is discarded. If an ad works, it is enhanced and bettered until it works even more powerfully – on you!

So how do you fight the flood of “get into debt messages”? By the simplest means: becoming aware of your debt level. In my upcoming articles I will spell this out in detail.

In the meantime, I’d like to hear your thoughts on the methods banks and credit cards use to get you ensnared in the debt trap? Are you glad, sad or mad about it? Comment below!

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15 Responses to “Your Life. 17.99% APR.”

  1. Ashlyn Faigin 05. Jun, 2011 at 4:13 pm

    Thanks for a really interesting read, learn quite a few tips here, trying hard to improve my credit , i did a consumer proposal 7 years ago and just now i am starting to rebuild my credit slowly but surely and trying to avoid that credit card trap.

  2. Not only are you bombarded by credit card offers but also offers from high end (expensive) schools in your field.

    I briefly looked at the Internet Marketing certificate from Fullsail and now on each site that cookie/ad follows me. Since I just finished school, I am not looking to go back. It is crazy how your interests are tracked.

  3. Hey, I found your blog in a new directory of blogs. I dont know how your blog came up, must have been a typo, anyway cool blog, I bookmarked you.

  4. Yeah, I’ve got consumer debt. It’s hard to convice grown adults that it’s not the normal thing to do. I can hear them parroting back my comments but their actions say something totally different.

  5. I look forward to reading more of your writing on debt. True there was a major, planned seduction of American consumers by credit card companies. However, the issue I want to see addressed is the “survival debt” accumulated in the last couple of years. As people were laid-off, downsized, fired…they needed to keep up with bills. Sometimes even those who have already done as experts advise and simplified their lives are using credit for things like groceries and insurance. This issue, unlike over indulgence, has been largely ignored. I meet people all the time who feel they have already done all they can without a job to solve their debt issues. Sadly there is a tangled web between debt and employment that needs to be unraveled.

  6. I think Liz is right on with her assessment of where the world has gone wrong financially. What’s the solution for “real life” living though if you’re not an super achiever?
    An young couple gross $40,000, then there’s payroll taxes, energy taxes, state and local taxes. Rent $500-800month, grocery’s ????, insurances, utilities, communication bills,clothing etc… All are mandatory in today’s world. How does one find an starter home or an decent $10,000 dependable vehicle without gaining debt?

  7. Hi Raymond,
    I totally agree with your blog above and I, also can relate to what Joan has said. I believe when all else fails, we need to call on God who promises “Seek first the Kingdom of God and his rigtheousness and all things will be added unto you”. God wants us to use our talents for the service of others, which relates very much to your philosopy of doing what we love. Thank you. Shirley

  8. I’m definitely needing a refresh and a revamping. I was doing pretty good at always paying off my credit balance month to month till last year when I got in way over my head with credit advances and letting an ex-partner abuse my generous and good credit to pay for his consumer needs.

    I’ve gotten myself in quite a mess in a short time and it is past due to clean up and take control.

  9. The immorality of enticing consumers to spend more and more and more is unconscionable. In the long run it is unsustainable and thereby robbing our children from a safe future. The cleverness of advertising, the greed of banks (yes that includes its shareholders-often regular people) and the boldness of large corporations like credit card companies is appalling and maddening. However, we all vote with our wallet many times a day. We all need to take responsibility for being participants in this dance and that requires a change in thinking, a change in spending……

  10. Hi Raymond,

    Not only are we being bombarded with ads to buy, but our children are as well and we need to ensure that the younger generations are financially savvy, and have the wisdom and awareness so they can make smart decisions and know when to say NO so they do not fall into some of these financial “traps”.

    Thank you for the information. I look forward to your next post.

  11. Hello Raymond,

    We have not had a TV for 5 years and not gone to the movies in far longer. We do watch movies on DVD – without ads. I read only the comics and front page of newspapers and few magazines. This manner of avoiding ads is not difficult, it is just like it was when I was a kid.

    Thank you for addressing this subject.

    Hugh

  12. I have a great saying on my fridge. I don’t know where it came from (so I can’t give credit to whoever said it)but it is “Never trade what you want most for what you want at the moment” The answer to staying out of debt is to have self discipline. Delayed gratification is something most successful or affluent people understand well. Be creative in finding new ways to earn money so you can “have it all”.

  13. Hello Raymond, Thank you for keeping in touch. My attempts to get out of debt have just sunk me deeper into debt. I pray that by reading your book again, I’ll succeed. Love, Joan

  14. I do believe it is time to shift the values of our nation away from consumerism and “get it now mentality” and back into saving to make purchases. The instant gratification that has been sold to the American consumer is going to cost dearly in the end. Sure businesses made a lot of money but the fall is going to be hard on everyone in our nation if not the world due to the global economy.
    Values were shifted from doing the right thing to “he who has the most toys win” when television shows portray people on welfare living in mansions while the rest of us get up and work hard to earn and still can’t afford that mansion it is no wonder the debt crisis has happened. We have all been taught not to measure who we are against ourselves but to measure our selves and our successes against those of others.